20 May, 2016

Andrew Coyne: Who says the Supreme Court won’t change its mind on doctor-assisted suicide — yet again? | National Post

Andrew Coyne of the National Post ruminates on what will follow the passage of the current euthanasia bill before Parliament.


But that would hardly be the end of it. Advocates of assisted suicide have already served notice they will challenge the legislation in court: because it does not apply to children, or the mentally incompetent; because it defines “grievous and irremediable” to mean, in part, that the patient’s “natural death has become reasonably foreseeable;” even for imposing a 15-day waiting period (since amended to 10).
 
They will not rest, in short, until there is an unrestricted right to death on demand. The question is what those opposed will do. Will they, at a minimum, resist these attempts to expand assisted suicide from the beachhead just established? To push further, will they be content, as their opponents are not, with the status quo as defined by C-14? Will they accept that assisted suicide should remain lawful in Canada, or will they assert the same right to relitigate the issue as its advocates?


Andrew Coyne: Who says the Supreme Court won’t change its mind on doctor-assisted suicide — yet again? | National Post

1 comment:

  1. Anonymous21 May, 2016

    Challenging euthanasia in the courts simply builds up a body of precedent in favor.

    ReplyDelete

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